Last call

Last call … red-tree-1

red-and-yellow-treeNov. 22, 2016

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Almost prime-time fall colors

Today’s colors weren’t quite the grandiose colors I’d hoped for, but you could find colors in the smaller picture. Behold:

Purty in yeller

Purty in yeller

I heard this repeated plink! plink! plink! in the woods. It was acorns trying to assassinate me. Vicious bastards missed me every time

I heard this repeated plink! plink! plink! in the woods. It was acorns trying to assassinate me. Vicious bastards missed me every time.

 

These apparently albino pumpkins have been left in the field. Seems kind of cruel.

These apparently albino pumpkins have been left in the field. Seems kind of cruel.

These bugs seem to be hogging the wilkweed, which I'm told is a mainstay for monarch butterflies. I'm fairly sure this is milkweed, but I could be wrong. Any botanists out there?

These bugs seem to be hogging the wilkweed, which I’m told is a mainstay for monarch butterflies. I’m fairly sure this is milkweed, but I could be wrong. Any botanists out there?

fern amid fallen leaves

Now

Now that’s what I’m talkin’ about

hawk 2

little daisies

little purple flowers

Everybody do the Locomotion

Everybody do the Locomotion

milkweed

mirror pond

poilpoe flowers

poilpoe flowers

Poilple Majesty

Poilple Majesty

red berries detail

 

red leaves with flower

red tree

Smashing pumpkins

Smashing pumpkins

white flower detail

Whi

White wispies

More white wispies

More white wispies

Just look up

Just look up

 

 

Blue ice before the meltdown

Ice in the Cuyahoga River gorge in Cuyahoga Falls. Yes, it really was blue (ish).

Ice in the Cuyahoga River gorge in Cuyahoga Falls. Yes, it really was blue (ish).

When there is a sustained freeze in Cuyahoga Falls, water seeping into the stone walls of the gorge along the mighty Cuyahoga River creates these cool ice formations. And when they get thick enough, they start to take on a bluish hue. There’s a scientific explanation for this phenomenon, having to do with how sunlight refracts with the ice (water) molecules, the same principal behind why deep ocean water looks blue.

I shot this about 4 p.m. Thursday from a lookover bridge off Front Street with my little ol’ Droid Mini.

The ice was just beginning to melt yesterday, and when a chunk dropped into the river, it made a spectacular crackle that resonated throughout the gorge. A photog sharing the overlook (sporting a DSLR camera) said the sound is even more impressive along the nearby walkway that descends into the gorge. I didn’t have time to explore further then, but maybe I’ll return before it all melts away. And I’ll take my DSLR next time.

Plumbing Nightmare, Chapter 6

This tale of plumbing woe is fraught with woulda- coulda- shouldas. Alas, it was not to be. And so I have a basement with soggy carpeting, soggy insulation and soggy not-so-drywall. This is yet another chapter in the saga of my hate-hate relationship with the plumbing in my house. Not familiar with the history? Curious? Follow the bread crumbs here.

Long story short: We had a well-publicized spell of unusually cold weather with temps dipping into the sub-zero teens and wind chills south of 30 below. I thought to leave my faucets on a slow drip overnight Monday but, oops, forgot.

Of course the pipes on my outer walls froze, meaning no water in the kitchen.

After a day of ventilating warm air behind the walls, I managed to get cold water restored to the kitchen sink, but hot water stayed stubbornly blocked.

So I was hopeful (delusional?) that the situation would resolve itself once things thawed out Wednesday.

I was wrong.

Stepped out briefly to get a newspaper (old habits die hard) and when I got back I heard an all-too-familiar sound of trickling water. Good thing I was around to shut off the water supply or the whole basement, which is finished, would have been flooded. Pool table and all. As it was, I still vacuumed up about 10 gallons of water.

Plumber is coming Friday a.m.  because, although I have some plumbing capability, installing and soldering pipe is not in my toolbox (yet). Today I tore out the drywall, guesstimating the source of the leak. It took two tries, but at least I didn’t have to tear out the entire wall. My drywall installation skills are rather limited as well. Repairs? Check. Spackle? Check. Paint? Check. Install entire walls? Eh, not so much.

The culprit was a pipe joint leading to the outside spigot. It simply came loose. Looks like it wasn’t even soldered! Well, having fixed plenty of other half-assed “upgrades” from previous occupants, I’m not surprised.

Anyway, below is the photographic evidence of my latest plumbing travail.

It can be truly said that this is a hole in the wall.

It can be truly said that this is a hole in the wall.

Drip. Drip. Drip.

Drip. Drip. Drip.

pipes4

This nearby waste line was the scene of a plumbing crime several years ago. They didn’t use PVC cement and of course it eventually came loose, leaving a stinking pool of kitchen wastewater in the same corner of the basement as my current situation. That occurred on a Christmas Eve. With company over. Naturally.

pipes6

I’m ready for my close-up, Mr. DeMille

Oh, look! A shut-off valve one foot away from the damage. Hidden behind the drywall. Brilliant!

Oh, look! A shut-off valve one foot away from the damage. Hidden behind the drywall. Brilliant!